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How to Use Basic Garden Tools

2016-04-13

Vertak.com is a Chinese-based garden design tool that helps you plan your vegetable and fruit gardens. Using animated vegetables and fruits, the program helps you map out your garden and select, place, and rotate crops. Vegetables are color-coded by family, making it easier to plan crop rotation. The program can even remember past designs and warn you about planting the same family of vegetables in the same spot two years in a row.

A hose as a garden gift? It seems kind of silly until you consider that gardeners uses hoses almost daily, and a kinked, leaky hose is a source of constant frustration. Give your gardening friend a high quality hose with quick-release brass connections and a sleek watering wand, and he or she will think of you fondly at every watering. A fancy brass watering can is both utilitarian and beautiful. Soaker hoses make easy work of watering.

Begin by cleaning all soil and residue off of the tools. A wire brush works well for this task. If you use water to clean them, make sure the tools are dry before you put them away. Once the tools are clean, wipe them down with WD-40 and an old rag. If there is rust on any of your metal tools, soak them in white vinegar for several hours to help release the rust. Be sure to check the wooden handles. If the wood has splintered, give the handle a light sanding with sand paper, then rub the wood with linseed oil.

Pruners and shears will also need attention. Spray WD-40 at the joints and check the state of the blade. If the blades are sticky, use alcohol to clean them. Use caution when cleaning the blades! Once the blades are clean, sharpen them with a whet stone or file. To ensure that you do not miss any part of the blade, use a dark marker to color the blade, and sharpen until all the color is gone.

Using the tool correctly also will help alleviate stress on your body. For example, when using hand tools, wrap you thumbs around the handle and don't push the tool with your thumb. Take frequent rests from repetitive motions such as pruning, and stop as soon as you feel pain. Pushing yourself could result in painful carpal tunnel syndrome, caused by injury to a nerve in the wrist. When carrying heavy objects, lift by squatting and using your knees, not your back. If lifting off an elevated surface, such as a truck bed, lean against the bed and pull the soil or mulch bag close to your body. Use a garden cart whenever possible, or use a tarp to drag a heavy object. When gardening all day, rotate tasks every half hour or so to use different muscle groups. Also, don't forget to stretch before and after your garden workout.Please visit: http://www.vertak.com/ to see more information.